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Around 40% of American couples now first meet online

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The dating app Tinder is shown on an Apple iPhone Some 39% of heterosexual couples that got together in the US in met online. Over the past two decades there has been an increasing trend towards people using the internet and dating applications to meet new partners. While there are. fish in the sea? When it comes to online dating, that might be the case, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. June 14, :

Could there be too many fish in the sea? When it comes to online dating, that might be the case, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. Jonathan D'Angelo, doctoral candidate in Communication Science, and Catalina Toma, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Arts, recently had their findings published in the print edition of Media Psychology. Toma and D'Angelo conducted an experiment with undergraduate students to find out how the number of choices online daters are given, and whether these choices are reversible, affects romantic outcomes. What they found was that a week after making their selection, online daters who chose from a large set of potential partners i. Those who selected from a large pool and had the ability to reverse their choice were the least satisfied with their selected partner after one week. It's a bit of choice overload, a theory economists use when talking about people buying products such as chocolate or pens.